Tag Archives: Pv Solar Installations

PG&E Free: Revolutionary Energy at Stone Edge Farm in Sonoma, California

By Jonah Raskin, CounterPunch

Pacific Gas & Electric has never had many loyal friends, not since 1905 when the San Francisco Gas and Electric Company and the California Gas and Electric Corporation merged to form the utility giant usually referred to as PG&E.

The company has been increasingly unpopular ever since gas leaks led to a big explosion and the death of consumers— eight people in San Bruno just south of San Francisco. Nor has the company made new friends ever since its power lines were found to have caused wild fires and huge property losses in California.

Earlier this year—to protect its profits and stockholders— the company filed for bankruptcy, though it still has citizens in a chokehold otherwise known as a monopoly. If consumers want electricity and gas in their homes and businesses they have little choice but to rely on PG&E, which owns and controls the power lines.

There are alternatives, including Sonoma Clean Power that sources clean energy from renewables: geothermal, water, wind, solar, and biomass. But Sonoma Clean Power doesn’t have its own power lines. PG&E has said it will cut off all power if and when there’s wild fire and high winds. That could save lives and protect property, but it also sounds like PG&E letting Californians know that it’s still the all-powerful boss.

With big bucks, access to the latest technology and technological wizards, citizens can by-pass PG&E. That’s what Mac and Leslie McQuown have done at Stone Edge Farm, a model of organic agriculture and a center for innovation in the field of energy. The farm is on Carriger Road, outside the town of Sonoma, where olives and grapes are grown. Not long ago, the visionary McQuowns had a big dream: reduce their carbon footprint. They’ve realized that dream and gone beyond it. Now, Stone Edge generates electrical power on a micro-grid that serves all its energy needs. 

Read full article from CounterPunch

MCE completes 3-MW solar project in Napa County, California

By Kelly Pickerel, Solar Power World

California community choice aggregation (CCA) MCE has completed its first local, renewable energy project in Napa County. Along with developer Renewable Properties, MCE held a ribbon cutting for the 3-MW American Canyon Solar Project this month.

This is the 12th local, small-scale renewable energy project MCE has completed in its four-county service area — and MCE’s first Feed-In Tariff (FIT) project in Napa County. The FIT program allows small-scale renewable energy projects to become long-term suppliers to MCE. MCE has approximately 31 MW of local renewable projects in its service area, with ~25 MW operational and ~6 MW in the pipeline.

Located on approximately 21 acres of land, the American Canyon Solar Project uses single-axis trackers. MCE and Renewable Properties have agreed to a 20-year power purchase agreement.

Read full article from Solar Power World

Solar Panels at Data Center to Save State Millions

By News Staff, Techwire

The California Department of Technology and the Department of General Services are touting the energy efficiency and resulting savings from a solar canopy in the parking lot of the state’s main data center in Rancho Cordova. The solar panels, which feed the data center, have been in place for about a year, according to a blog post on CDT’s website.

“Since its completion in September 2018, the 76,000-square-foot solar canopy, located at CDT’s Gold Camp Data Center facility in Rancho Cordova, has generated more than 1 million kilowatt hours of electricity and is on track to double that amount annually,” says the blog post. “The energy generation will account for about 10 percent of the facility’s annual electrical demand while reducing nearly 10 tons of greenhouse gas emissions.”

The energy produced on a typical summer day from the “green” structure, which covers 316 parking spaces, can reach 1 megawatt of power per hour — enough to power 164 homes, according to CDT.

Read full article from Techwire

Local residents band together to fight Cambria solar panel project

By Connor Hoffman, Lockport Union-Sun & Journal

They come from different backgrounds and hold a wide variety of political beliefs. The one thing they do have in common is a dislike for a plan that they fear could have a negative and long-lasting impact on the fabric of their community.

“We’re regular Joe Shmoes,” said Ed Saleh, one of more than 200 members of the group called Cambria Opposition to Industrial Solar. “We are Independents. We are Democrats. We are Republicans. It doesn’t matter what party line we are. We’re everybody. We’re the forgotten people of New York state.”

Saleh and dozens of his neighbors have banded together in an effort to stop the development of a 900-acre solar project which has been proposed by the company Cypress Creek Renewables.

Cypress Creek Renewables, a company with corporate offices in California and North Carolina, has proposed the Bear Ridge Solar Project, which involves the proposed leasing of 900 acres of private land throughout a 5,000-acre project area in southern Cambria and a portion of northern Pendleton. The developers plan to install solar panels mounted in rows on racking systems up to 12 feet high. The panels would be visible from a distance of about 1-1/2 miles, including from sites on Bear Ridge Road and IDA Park Drive in Lockport.

Read full article in the Lockport Union-Sun & Journal

Amazon Joins Walmart in Blaming Tesla Solar Panels for Fires

By Dana Hull and Matt Day, Bloomberg

Walmart Inc. isn’t the only corporation that has seen its Tesla Inc. solar panels catch fire.

On Friday, Amazon.com Inc. said a June 2018 blaze on the roof of one of its warehouses in Redlands, California, involved a solar system that Tesla’s SolarCity division installed. The Seattle-based retail giant said by email that it has since taken steps to protect its facilities and has no plans to install more Tesla systems.

Tesla also said in a statement it worked with Amazon following the “isolated event” last year that occurred in an inverter at one of the sites. “Tesla worked collaboratively with Amazon to root cause the event and remediate,” it said. “We also performed inspections at the other sites, which confirmed the integrity of the systems,” adding that all 11 Amazon sites are generating energy and are monitored and maintained.

News of the Amazon fire comes days after Walmart sued Tesla, accusing it of shoddy panel installations that led to fires at more than a half-dozen stores. The claims threaten to further erode Tesla’s solar business as the company is fighting to gain back market share.

Read full article from Bloomberg

Related Article: Amazon Echoes Walmart’s Claims That Tesla Solar Panels Sparked Rooftop Fire (Gizmodo) – Aug. 24, 2019

California solar plus storage shows consistent installs, residential growth

By John Weaver, pv magazine

The California Solar & Storage Association (CALSSA) has collected and shared data on California’s behind the meter solar+storage activity in the first half of 2019, with data that goes back to the beginning of 2016.

The data suggests that within the three main investor owned utilities – San Diego Gas & Electric, Southern California Edison and Pacific Gas & Electric – commercial interconnections are running slightly behind the 2018 numbers in terms of projects interconnected. However, residential systems seem to be picking up a bit. 

One chart that gives a bit of indigestion is the time for approval for stand alone and solar+storage installations – if only because of the high variance, but also because quite a few larger projects take more than a year to get approved. The projects are divided into residential, commercial, education and industrial with time frames ranging roughly from 30 to 60 days for residential, to two years for industrial systems. Adding solar power to a storage installation seems to speed up the amount of time for a residential installation, however, it slows a commercial installation.

In Pacific Gas & Electric territory 20% of residential energy storage systems are stand alone, while in the other territories solar is coupled with storage 99-100% of time. Commercial installations had an inverse relationship though – with only 40% of storage projects coupled with solar power, suggesting the market is being driven by other factors like demand charges.

Read full article from pv magazine

 

Solar is coming to all new California homes. How many in Fresno already get power from sun?

By Tim Sheehan, The Fresno Bee

More than 1 million California homes are already soaking up sunshine with solar panels to generate electricity. Next year, that number will surge as new building standards take effect requiring all new homes permitted after Jan. 1 to have solar photovoltaic systems.

In Fresno, which already has the third-highest number of homes in California with rooftop solar panels, the number continues to grow even before the new California Energy Commission standards take full effect. Through the first six months of 2019, the city issued permits for more than 1,640 residential solar systems as additions or alterations to existing homes. That doesn’t count solar panels that home builders or developers are already offering as a feature on new homes.

As of June 30, more than 23,300 Fresno homes had solar systems in operation under the state’s Net Energy Metering (NEM) program. That’s third behind only San Diego and Bakersfield among California cities, according to data from Go Solar California. The total electrical output capacity of Fresno’s residential solar panel systems amounted to almost 148,700 kilowatts of direct current (DC) power. That’s about 144,000 kilowatts of alternating current or AC electricity after it’s converted from DC.

Fresno also has another 1,742 homes with solar installed from 2007 through 2017 under the older California Solar Initiative program.

Read full article in the Fresno Bee

Kroger Announces its Largest Solar Energy Project to Date

By Emily Holbrook, Energy Manager Today

Ralphs, a subsidiary of The Kroger Co., recently announced the installation of a photovoltaic solar power array at its automated distribution center in Paramount, Calif., a 555,000-square-foot building that provides products to 190 Ralphs stores and 95 Food 4 Less stores throughout Southern California.

This is the largest solar energy project to date for Kroger, featuring more than 7,000 solar panels to harness energy from the sun. The new installation has a 2 MW AC capacity and will generate 4.28 million kWh of clean power for the facility each year, representing approximately 50% of the facility’s total electricity needs.

The company’s supply chain team partnered with Affordable Solar on the installation with support from Southern California Edison and the City of Paramount.

Read full article from Energy Manager Today

Fresno Unified School District and ForeFront Power commence construction of 8.2 MW solar-plus-storage portfolio across 8 sites

ForeFront Power and Fresno Unified School District (“Fresno USD”) are thrilled to announce the groundbreaking of 8.2 megawatts (MW) of solar parking canopy systems across 8 District facilities. The portfolio of projects, which includes intelligent energy storage solutions provided by Stem Inc., is expected to save Fresno USD over $27 million over 20 years.

Fresno USD partnered with ForeFront Power after a rigorously competitive solicitation. In Fall 2017, School Project for Utility Rate Reduction (SPURR) and Fresno USD conducted a statewide request for proposal process to select the best solar and energy storage provider. The comprehensive procurement process through SPURR enabled the District to save considerable time, money, and resources in their procurement process.

Construction of the solar canopy systems is underway at Bullard, Fresno, Roosevelt, and McLane High Schools with the remaining four sites (Edison, Hoover, and Sunnyside High Schools and Service Center) breaking ground in the coming weeks. These 8 solar projects are expected to offset the equivalent of 10,633 tons of carbon dioxide avoidance annually or 2,000 cars taken off the road for the first year of production.

Read full press release from ForeFront Power

Santa Monica Mandates Rooftop Solar On New Buildings

San Francisco recently made headlines for establishing an ordinance requiring solar installations on new buildings, and now, yet another California city has passed similar legislation.

The Santa Monica City Council has approved an ordinance mandating rooftop solar systems on all new residential and commercial buildings in the city. And although San Francisco’s ordinance goes into effect in 2017, Santa Monica’s kicks off in fewer than 30 days, on May 26. Other cities in the Sunshine State that created such solar mandates include Sebastopol and Lancaster, which passed their ordinances in 2013.

According to the Santa Monica government, the ordinance capitalizes on market trends in the solar industry. With the cost of solar installations continuing to decrease, Santa Monica residents and developers will now generate renewable energy, improve the value of their property, and contribute to the city’s long-range goals for energy and climate mitigation, including reaching carbon neutrality by 2050.

Read full article from Solar Industry