Tag Archives: Southern California Edison

Kroger Announces its Largest Solar Energy Project to Date

By Emily Holbrook, Energy Manager Today

Ralphs, a subsidiary of The Kroger Co., recently announced the installation of a photovoltaic solar power array at its automated distribution center in Paramount, Calif., a 555,000-square-foot building that provides products to 190 Ralphs stores and 95 Food 4 Less stores throughout Southern California.

This is the largest solar energy project to date for Kroger, featuring more than 7,000 solar panels to harness energy from the sun. The new installation has a 2 MW AC capacity and will generate 4.28 million kWh of clean power for the facility each year, representing approximately 50% of the facility’s total electricity needs.

The company’s supply chain team partnered with Affordable Solar on the installation with support from Southern California Edison and the City of Paramount.

Read full article from Energy Manager Today

Building the 21st Century Power System

By Ted Craver (Chairman, President & CEO of Edison International), EnergyBiz Magazine – Fall 2015

Imagine for a moment that you are a homeowner or a small-business owner and you just shelled out $25,000 or more for a shiny new rooftop solar generator. Then imagine your electric utility told you that you could not hook it up to the grid right away, not until your neighborhood circuit was upgraded. And even then, it said you could only turn it on during certain hours. I am guessing you would not be a happy customer.

As CEO of one of the nation’s largest electric power companies, I do not want to be in the business of telling our customers what they can install on their own properties and how they can use it. As utilities, we don’t control what customers put behind the meter. We don’t tell them what TVs and appliances they can buy. The same should apply to PV solar panels, home batteries and electric cars.

Our job as utilities is to provide the power network that enables customers to choose which energy technologies they want to use. At Edison International and Southern California Edison, we like to call it a “plug-and-play” network, meaning that customers should be able to plug in any device and have it work seamlessly with our power system. Building that network to provide customer choice broadly across our system requires us to modernize the power grid so it can accommodate these new technologies… That is why we are building a more flexible, resilient and low-carbon electricity distribution grid for the 21st century and beyond. Modernizing the grid will not only preserve reliability in the face of increasingly complex distributed energy resources, it will also allow us to utilize these resources to provide grid services.

Read full article from EnergyBiz

A Revolutionary Roadmap for California’s Distributed Energy Future

By Jeff St. John, Greentech Media

California is already changing its utility and energy regulations to incorporate rooftop solar, behind-the-meter energy storage, plug-in electric vehicles and other grid-edge resources, arguably faster than any other state. But a group of utilities and energy industry members have ideas for even more radical transformations ahead.

On Tuesday, the Advanced Energy Economy Institute released a report that calls for California regulators to consider entirely new ways for its major utilities to invest in and operate a distributed energy resource-rich grid, and how to get paid for it. The report, Toward a 21st Century Electricity System in California, lays out a laundry list of concepts that could help utilities shed their institutional need for investing in traditional generation and grid infrastructure, and encourage them to embrace customer-owned and third-party-controlled distributed energy resources (DERs) as an alternative.

The ideas aren’t that novel in and of themselves. What’s more noteworthy is the list of participants in the working group that created the document. That list includes California utilities Pacific Gas & Electric and Southern California Edison, as well as DER providers like SolarCity, Stem, SunPower, Enphase, EnerNOC, ChargePoint and SunEdison, which have at times sparred with the state’s utilities over how to balance utility and third-party interests when it comes to distributed energy.

Read full article from Greentech Media

Related article: Report—Incentives hold back clean energy (The San Diego Union Tribune)

The Solar Industry Stands Divided Over California’s 50% Renewable Energy Target

By Julia Pyper, Greentech Media

These days, it’s rare to see rooftop solar installers and investor-owned utilities aligned on state policy issues. But in California, the two industry groups are both lobbying for behind-the-meter solar to count toward the state’s expanded renewable portfolio standard.

SB 350, the “Clean Energy and Pollution Reduction Act of 2015,” seeks to increase the state’s renewable energy target from 33 percent by 2020, to 50 percent by 2030. It also calls for cutting petroleum use in the transportation sector by half, and doubling the energy efficiency of buildings over the next 15 years. The bill has already passed the California Senate, and is now making its way through the Assembly.

One of the issues both utilities and solar installers have raised is that distributed solar should not be treated any differently than utility-scale solar as the state crafts the rules around meeting the new 50 percent target. As the RPS stands today, California utilities are only required to buy energy and renewable energy credits (RECs) from utility-scale solar plants. California is the only state in the country that does not count distributed solar toward the state’s RPS goal, either through a distributed generation carve-out or by generating RECs.

In letters to the Assembly Committee on Utilities and Commerce, Southern California Edison and PG&E argue that “state policy should not pick technology winners and losers, favoring only utility-scale renewables,” and call on the legislature to “expand the scope of eligible renewable resources to include distributed generation facilities such as rooftop solar that the state already acknowledges are renewable, yet do not count toward the RPS goal.” This change would give utilities more ways to meet the lofty 50 percent RPS goal. It would also give them a potentially more affordable way to meet the goal by leveraging existing and future private investment toward meeting the RPS, rather than necessarily having to contract for new large-scale projects using ratepayer dollars.

The issue has made strange bedfellows of power companies and rooftop solar installers, which have clashed in several states over the future of net energy metering. Meanwhile, it has pitted rooftop solar companies against large-scale solar installers, which are actively lobbying against the RPS change.

Read full article from Greentech Media

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Southern California Edison To Buy Solar Energy From Borrego PV Projects

Southern California Edison (SCE) has signed power purchase agreements (PPA) with Borrego Solar Systems for the electricity generated from rooftop wholesale distributed generation (WDG) projects.

Under the five 20-year PPAs, SCE will purchase 10MW solar photovoltaic (PV) capacity from the WDG projects which Borrego Solar plans to build. The systems will be located on industrial warehouse buildings in Southern California.

These projects are part of SCE’s fourth solicitation under the Solar Photovoltaic Program (SPVP) for Independent Power Producers, a five-year program to procure 125 MW of primarily rooftop PV projects. These new PPAs will bring Borrego Solar’s total participation in the program to nine projects totaling 17 MW. Once fully operational, the Borrego Solar portfolio will generate enough energy to power approximately 3,672 homes.

Read full article from Energy Business Review

California’s Distributed Energy Grid Plans: The Next Steps

By Jeff St. John, Greentech Media

Last week, after a year of behind-the-scenes work and much public debate, California’s big three investor-owned utilities turned in their long-awaited distribution resource plans (DRPs). These DRPs are essentially blueprints for how Pacific Gas & Electric, Southern California Edison, and San Diego Gas & Electric are going to merge rooftop solar, behind-the-meter energy storage, plug-in electric vehicles and other distributed energy resources (DERs) into their day-to-day grid operations and long-range distribution grid planning and investment regimes.

Each California utility has created mapping tools that show how much capacity is available on each distribution circuit for new DER interconnection, for instance — something that could be very useful for distributed energy developers. All three utilities have also agreed on a common set of measures for how DERs could help shore up grid capacity, increase reliability, serve system-wide needs, and otherwise stand in for costly utility upgrades. And each has laid out how it plans to fold these DRP methodologies into their general rate cases (GRCs), the once-every-three-years process that determines how much each can charge its customers for its capital and operating costs for the coming years.

Many questions remain about how to determine which combination of DERs will meet the least-cost models that utilities use to rank their distribution grid upgrades, and what kinds of new capabilities grid-supporting DERs will need to have to serve as replacements for utility investments. There’s also much uncertainty about how DERs serving as stand-ins for grid infrastructure should be paid for, and how their costs and benefits should be shared. These issues are of major interest for solar-storage combinations from SolarCity and Tesla, SunEdison and Green Charge Networks, Sungevity and Sonnenbatterie, and SunPower and partners Stem and Sunverge, which see an opportunity for earning grid services revenues as stand-ins for distribution grid investments. They’re also important for the commercial building and residential energy management platform providers looking for ways to tap California’s emerging opportunities for distributed demand response.

These costs and values wouldn’t just flow from utilities and their customers to DER providers—each utility’s DRP asks the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) for permission to spend lots of money on beefing up their own systems to enable their visions. Southern California Edison alone is estimating its DRP-related capital expenditures could add up to $347 million to $560 million over the next three years, for example, and PG&E and SDG&E will also be seeking new funding, though they haven’t yet specified how much.

All three DRPs add up to nearly 1,000 pages, which makes it hard to summarize all the next steps they contain, but here are a few highlights of the challenges to come.

Read full article from Greentech Media

Related articles: How California’s biggest utilities plan to integrate distributed resources (Utility Dive)

California electricity prices to rise for those who use the least

By David R. Baker, The San Francisco Chronicle

Californians’ electricity rates are about to undergo their most sweeping changes since the state’s energy crisis 15 years ago, cutting costs for people who use large amounts of power while raising bills for more efficient homeowners. The question is, how many people will pay more?

The California Public Utilities Commission is scheduled to vote Friday on two competing proposals to radically revamp the way electricity rates work at the state’s big, investor-owned utilities: Pacific Gas and Electric Co., Southern California Edison and San Diego Gas & Electric Co. Both proposals would narrow the gap between prices paid by people who use large amounts of electricity and those who use less. But one proposal, backed by the utilities, would go further than the other, raising utility bills at least $10 per month for an estimated 80 percent of residential customers next year as a result. It would also eventually allow the utilities to impose a fixed monthly charge on all customers, an idea the companies like but consumer advocates hate. The second proposal, from Commissioner Mike Florio, would boost monthly bills at least $10 for 35 percent of residential customers, and explicitly rejects fixed monthly charges.

The issue has been the subject of a fierce lobbying fight ever since 2013, when California legislators authorized the commission to reform electricity rates from top to bottom. Utilities, consumer groups, business associations and solar companies all entered the fray, each trying to tweak the details to their advantage. While arguing over how to fix it, most agreed the current system wouldn’t last.

No element of rate reform provoked a bigger fight than fixed charges. Utilities consider them a way to make sure everyone pays the cost of maintaining the electrical grid, at a time when an increasing number of homeowners are installing solar panels to generate their own electricity.

Read full article in the San Francisco Chronicle

How California plans to integrate distributed resources into its ISO market

By Herman K. Trabish, Utility Dive

A new era of grid operations is about to begin in California.

The state’s grid operator is preparing to offer aggregators of distributed energy resources (DERs) the opportunity to sell into its marketplace, the first in the nation to do so. DERs are the resources on the customer side or the distribution grid side of the electric system, such as rooftop solar, energy storage, plug-in electric vehicles, and demand response, and are typically below the 500 kW minimum size required to sell into the ISO system.

CAISO’s Final Plan

The “straw proposal,” an early draft of the ISO’s DERP initiative, was published last November to give stakeholders an opportunity to comment.  The final draft of the ISO’s plan answers many of the stakeholder concerns, with a focus on details of expanded metering and telemetry, the communications and counting methods, and the technologies the grid operator will need.

DER Aggregation

The ISO’s proposal provides a framework for the aggregation of DER to meet the ISO’s 0.5 MW minimum participation requirement and participate in ISO wholesale markets as an aggregated resource. The ISO proposes to classify a distributed energy resource provider or “DERP” as the owner/operator of one or more aggregations of individual distributed energy resources2 (DER) that participate in the ISO market as an aggregate resource rather than as individual resources.

Metering

In today’s California market, all of CAISO’s centralized generators have a resource identity (resource ID) and are required to have “revenue quality metering.” That can be via a direct interaction between the ISO and the resource ID, or it can be through a scheduling coordinator that mediates between the ISO and the resource ID. But for distributed resources, assigning a resource ID to each one is not feasible.

The proposal allows a scheduling coordinator to take administrative control of aggregated distributed energy accounts and meter them with any technology, including any online technology, that suits their purposes. The aggregator can be its own scheduling coordinator or can hire a third-party. A directly connected interface between the ISO and the aggregator is no longer required.

Locational dispersion and capacity of DERP aggregations

There are some 4,900 market pricing nodes (PNodes) on the ISO system. The system is also divided into load aggregation points (LAPs) that follow the territories of the state’s three investor-owned utilities. They are subdivided into sub-LAPs. With the issue of counting the DERPs clarified, the proposal takes up the question of how the ISO can keep track of the multiple sources and types and locations of DERs with which it will have to deal.

Under the new proposal, DERP aggregations may consist of one or more sub-resources at single or multiple locations. There can be multiple small resources across multiple PNodes, but they must be within one sub-LAP.  There is no minimum size limitation on the individual sub-resources in a DERP aggregation. This means that individual sub-resources may exceed the ISO’s minimum participation requirement of 0.5 MW. DERP aggregations across multiple PNodes may not exceed 20 MW, but for DERP aggregations limited to a single PNode, there is no MW size limitation.

Mixing DERs

For DERP aggregations limited to a single PNode, the sub-resources may be heterogeneous – that is, a mixture of sub-resource types is permitted, and there is no MW size limitation. It is not required that all of the sub-resources move in the same direction, only that the net movement of the aggregate of the sub-resources equate to the ISO dispatch instruction.

DERP aggregations across multiple PNodes may not exceed 20 MW. For DERP aggregations across multiple PNodes, all sub-resources within that sub-LAP must be homogenous and must move in the same direction as the ISO dispatch instruction. Homogenous aggregations are those in which all sub-resources are generation, energy storage acting together in charge or discharge only, or are load. For aggregations of energy storage, all sub-resources must be operating in the same mode (i.e., charging or discharging, but not a mix of the two) in response to an ISO dispatch.

The ISO performs network analyses to make certain the system is receiving what the market is selling into it. Sub-resources in an aggregation across multiple PNodes can cause distribution variability. But the PNode distribution variability must be minimized or “the congestion impacts estimated in the network analysis will be off.”  Until the ISO has enough operational experience to know whether the distribution variability would be a problem, it wants to limit DER aggregations “to those that move in the same direction as the ISO dispatch instruction.”

This is especially relevant to aggregated solar-plus-storage technologies that might be producing both load and generation, the final draft acknowledges. “The ISO recognizes that there is great interest in aggregating mixtures of rooftop solar, energy storage, plug-in electric vehicles, and demand response across multiple PNodes, without all the limitations required in this proposal. The ISO plans to examine such options in subsequent initiatives.”

Wait ‘Til Next Year

Several stakeholders suggested provisions be made for demand response (DR) in aggregations of distributed resources, but the ISO chose to limit its role, and does not include demand response participating as Proxy Demand Resource (PDR) or Reliability Demand Response Resource (RDRR) in the DERP proposal. In the proposal, the ISO clarifies that demand response participating as PDR or RDRR would continue to participate under its existing demand response framework and not under the DERP framework. The ISO says the existing PDR and RDRR framework already provides for market participation of aggregated demand response. This existing framework is designed to accommodate load reducing resources whose performance is assessed under a baseline methodology.

Stakeholders also suggested including in the DERP final proposal both the alternative baselines for PDR, and the alignment between distribution level interconnection and the ISO New Resource Implementation process. They are part of a separate energy storage initiative. These suggestions were declined. To facilitate bringing aggregated DERs into its marketplace, the ISO wants to include initially only those that can be directly metered under the specified terms.

The ISO will take formal comments on the final draft through June 24th. If approved by the Board in mid-July, the ISO will probably file by early autumn with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. That approval will require at least 60 days.

Read full article in Utility Dive

SCE Continues Encouraging Solar Development

Southern California Edison (SCE) this week issued a press release that describes the utility’s ongoing efforts to encourage and support the development and interconnection of solar projects within its service territory.

According to the release, SCE has about 125,000 rooftop solar systems installed in its territory, totaling more than 1,000 megawatts. Those systems include residential and non-residential installations, as well as some utility-owned projects. Nearly 600 megawatts are from residential projects.

Adding to those totals, SCE also recently announced that the California Public Utilities Commission has approved 22 projects totaling 42.6 megawatts of direct current power from the utility’s fourth solicitation to obtain electricity from independent power producers as part of its Solar Photovoltaic Program (SPVP).

Read the full press release from Southern California Edison

California Utilities Ready Plans For Community Solar Programs

By Herman K. Trabish, Utility Drive

As mandated by Senate Bill 43, California is about to initiate a community shared solar program requiring its three dominant investor-owned utilities — Pacific Gas & Electric, Southern California Edison, and San Diego Gas & Electric — to obtain 600 megawatts of new capacity by 2019. Solar advocates question the affordability of the utility programs.

Rooftop solar installers do not expect the community shared solar arrays to interfere with their business opportunities because subscribers are expected to be from the 48% of businesses and 49% of residences that do not have solar-suitable roofs. It could compete with municipal governments’ community-choice aggregation programs.

Read full article from Utility Drive